Can you make money SEOing for local businesses?

Kush

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#1
I know a fair amount about SEO, and am learning more and more as I am preparing to launch my first site, and I also know a decent amount about SEOing for local businesses through the use of google places, location keywords, etc.

My question is, could I make some quick cash if I called up new businesses or businesses that didn't have a very optimized page, and offered to SEO their site for $100?
 
#2
Add me to skype h2obrandon I will explain a bit about this niche and how I have made a decent amount in it. I also think we might be able to help each other out a bit.
 

Kush

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#4
I'll add you h2obrandon. Sorry it took me a while to reply. I've been a but busy with a vacation this week, and haven't had access to a computer with a webcam. But I just sent you a friend request, looking forward to working with you!
 
#5
Hi!

Add me to skype h2obrandon I will explain a bit about this niche and how I have made a decent amount in it. I also think we might be able to help each other out a bit.
Hi, my name is Diego.

First, sorry for my bad english. I'm from spain and it's a bit difficult the english grammar xD.
I would like to ask if I can add to skype.

I read a post in which you explain a bit more about the local business seo.

I have read lots of books about selling things, making intermediary through local pages positioned in google ...

I wish I could work in my town selling it but I have no idea .... could you guide me? Which method you use and / or books have you served?

Thank you very much, I hope to answer about what skype.

A big hug,
Diego
 

Kush

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#6
Hey there Diego. I know a little bit of Spanish myself from school. I actually want to go do a semester in Spain during college sometime so that I can fully learn the language through immersion.

Well, to business! SEOing for local businesses can either be easy or hard depending where you live. If you live somewhere really populated and big like a big city, for example, it will be harder because everybody will be SEOing their pages, and have some knowledge of the importance of SEO for their business- therefore the competition is going to be harder.

However, if you're in a small town like I am in rural Southern United States, it's not so hard. Just call around to local businesses and do some research to find local businesses that don't show up on the first page of google.

For example: I work at a frozen yogurt shop part-time. It's only been open for a year. The frozen yogurt business has recently become very big in my town. Now I google around a bit for the keyword "frozen yogurt charleston (my town)". I find about every other well-known yogurt shop in town except mine ranked on the first page of google, whether it be their home page or on Google Places/ Maps.

My yogurt shop's web page for one isn't very pretty. It's simple, kind of sloppy, and doesn't attract customers right off. Then I go on Google Places and check my yogurt shop's rankings. Their Google Places page has no photos, no descriptions, no customer reviews, no nothing except a phone number.

So I could probably go to my boss and offer him my services for money. I could keyword optimize his site for the keyword "frozen yogurt charleston."
I could also give him a nice Google Places profile. I could add pictures to it, a nice keyword optimized and well written description, and even call up a few loyal customers and ask them to write a good review on it/ their experience.

I could work on building up their facebook fan page. Possibly by convincing the owners to offer coupons for joining the fan page, or some other incentive.

And Bam. Suddenly my yogurt shop could be a lot more well known. When customers seeking frozen yogurt shops type in "frozen yogurt charleston," my yogurt shop would hopefully appear on the first page of Google, and when they clicked on their Google Places profile, they would be greeted with a nice page that is descriptive, has pictures, and honest customer reviews.

So as you see that's a general overview of what local SEO requires, and as you can see, it can profit a business greatly. So any wise shop owner should be more than willing to drop a couple hundred at least to have their business show up better on search engines and gain them more potential customers.
By the way, the only reason I have yet to do this with my yogurt shop is because it feels a bit awkward selling my services to my boss who I already work for haha.

Hope this was helpful!
And feel free to add me on skype: trillion_watt
 
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noxon

Very Active Members
#7
Hi Kush, your post was really helpful to me. I have a doubt though. After Google merged Google Places with Google+ Pages... Should I still list the local business at Google[dot]com/places/ or can I go straight to add it as a Google+ Local Page and forget about the old Google Places Page?

I would appreciate your reply.
Thanks

Hey there Diego. I know a little bit of Spanish myself from school. I actually want to go do a semester in Spain during college sometime so that I can fully learn the language through immersion.

Well, to business! SEOing for local businesses can either be easy or hard depending where you live. If you live somewhere really populated and big like a big city, for example, it will be harder because everybody will be SEOing their pages, and have some knowledge of the importance of SEO for their business- therefore the competition is going to be harder.

However, if you're in a small town like I am in rural Southern United States, it's not so hard. Just call around to local businesses and do some research to find local businesses that don't show up on the first page of google.

For example: I work at a frozen yogurt shop part-time. It's only been open for a year. The frozen yogurt business has recently become very big in my town. Now I google around a bit for the keyword "frozen yogurt charleston (my town)". I find about every other well-known yogurt shop in town except mine ranked on the first page of google, whether it be their home page or on Google Places/ Maps.

My yogurt shop's web page for one isn't very pretty. It's simple, kind of sloppy, and doesn't attract customers right off. Then I go on Google Places and check my yogurt shop's rankings. Their Google Places page has no photos, no descriptions, no customer reviews, no nothing except a phone number.

So I could probably go to my boss and offer him my services for money. I could keyword optimize his site for the keyword "frozen yogurt charleston."
I could also give him a nice Google Places profile. I could add pictures to it, a nice keyword optimized and well written description, and even call up a few loyal customers and ask them to write a good review on it/ their experience.

I could work on building up their facebook fan page. Possibly by convincing the owners to offer coupons for joining the fan page, or some other incentive.

And Bam. Suddenly my yogurt shop could be a lot more well known. When customers seeking frozen yogurt shops type in "frozen yogurt charleston," my yogurt shop would hopefully appear on the first page of Google, and when they clicked on their Google Places profile, they would be greeted with a nice page that is descriptive, has pictures, and honest customer reviews.

So as you see that's a general overview of what local SEO requires, and as you can see, it can profit a business greatly. So any wise shop owner should be more than willing to drop a couple hundred at least to have their business show up better on search engines and gain them more potential customers.
By the way, the only reason I have yet to do this with my yogurt shop is because it feels a bit awkward selling my services to my boss who I already work for haha.

Hope this was helpful!
And feel free to add me on skype: trillion_watt
 

Kush

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#8
Glad to be of help, noxon!

As to your question, I would do both. While there are a fair amount of people who use Google+, there are a lot of people who don't. The average person searching for a local restaurant will just type it into their google search bar, and not give much mind to signing into their G+ account.

They are looking to find something quick and easy for the most part.
From my point of view, Google+ Places seems to be a place where people go after they have been to that business to chat, discuss, share photos, etc.

Regular Google Place/ Maps seems to be the first place people go when searching for a business.

Both regular Google Places and Google+ are relatively simple to set up, so doing both pages seems to be the sure path to me- Hell, maybe it can even give you an opportunity to squeeze a few extra bucks out of your client.
 

noxon

Very Active Members
#9
Thanks again for your reply ;)

Is interesting what you said about ppl will just type what they are looking for into their google search bar.. in fact this was one of the reasons I got the doubt I asked before cuz I saw a Google+ Page ranking #2 in a local search.. and the most interesting to me is that it was outranking the rest 5 local pages in the first page. But anyway.. you clarified my doubts. I just was afraid the normal local pages was useless already.

Thanks!

Glad to be of help, noxon!

As to your question, I would do both. While there are a fair amount of people who use Google+, there are a lot of people who don't. The average person searching for a local restaurant will just type it into their google search bar, and not give much mind to signing into their G+ account.

They are looking to find something quick and easy for the most part.
From my point of view, Google+ Places seems to be a place where people go after they have been to that business to chat, discuss, share photos, etc.

Regular Google Place/ Maps seems to be the first place people go when searching for a business.

Both regular Google Places and Google+ are relatively simple to set up, so doing both pages seems to be the sure path to me- Hell, maybe it can even give you an opportunity to squeeze a few extra bucks out of your client.
 

Kush

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Very Active Members
#10
I mean I pretty much think they're about the same thing. As a matter of fact, I just did some more research and looked it up, and it looks like they are the exact same thing.

Google must have just merged the two into one program. It looks like Google places is now just Google + pages. The only difference is that to comment/ review a location, you have to be signed into Google +, not just your gmail account.
Sorry for the confusion :goodnight: haha
 

noxon

Very Active Members
#11
ha ha .. no prob

So.. then should I still verify the local page with phone number and so on? Just I know before someone could still your listing but now I think this would be only possible if someone has your google password no?

I mean I pretty much think they're about the same thing. As a matter of fact, I just did some more research and looked it up, and it looks like they are the exact same thing.

Google must have just merged the two into one program. It looks like Google places is now just Google + pages. The only difference is that to comment/ review a location, you have to be signed into Google +, not just your gmail account.
Sorry for the confusion :goodnight: haha
 

Monopoly

Very Active Members
#12
Yes you can certainly market your skills to offline businesses. There has been a million and one guides sold on the subject (I'm sure you'll find some of them here on MMD) it does involve contacting a lot of people one way or the other and making the sale though.

Depending on where you live you might also find SEO jobs locally. I recently searched my city for SEO jobs and was pretty surprised at the amount of them and the salary in some cases.
 

VHSEO_Mike

Very Active Members
#13
For local business, offline marketing could be a great tool, so do some offline advertizing. For quality workers, you could visit outsourcing sites. They have many good workers these days. You should not trust someone who does not even have an optimized site. How can he deliver something good? I doubt.
 
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